Mosque Turned Into Pop-Up Covid-19 Vaccination Centre

east london mosque

The East London Mosque has set up a pop-up Covid-19 vaccination centre at its premises to help ease mistrust in the Muslim community about getting the jab.

Young children went with their grandparents and relatives aged over 68 in the bitter winter chill to the makeshift clinic for the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine.

Asad Jaman of the East London Mosque said misinformation, confusion and negative online information had created concerns about the vaccine, including from some people who even suggested that the Covid-19 virus is not real.

“We are telling the people that it is wise for you to take the vaccine because you are not only helping yourself but you are helping the community and beyond,” he said.

“As a Muslim, it is very important that we give time and support the preservation of life.”

east london mosque

The urgent need for the service in the inner-city region was spotted after officials in the east London borough of Tower Hamlets saw significant levels of vaccine hesitancy, particularly among its large ethnic minority community.

Posters to promote the clinic sought to reassure the pensioners that “the Covid vaccination is the best protection for you and your family” in the light of fake messages which have spread concern among the community.

Mr Jaman said people have been scared because the vaccine was developed so rapidly and they felt there must have been side-effects due to that, but medics and mosque officials were on hand at the clinic to help quell any fears.

The mosque is offering to be a community vaccine center for as long as is needed due to its place in the community and the levels of trust.


The mosque, which has a position of trust within the community, managed to give 100 jabs within the first hour of opening the clinic and was aiming for 400 injections by the end of the session.

It is hoped the clinic, along with the medical experts who were there to give advice, can build trust that the vaccine is safe and effective.

There are no animal or egg products in the vaccine, which is vegan, halal and kosher friendly, they state.

Muslim GPs, imams and scholars have also been trying to get the message out to the local community to have the vaccination.

The mosque is offering to be a community vaccine center for as long as is needed due to its place in the community and the levels of trust.


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